Diet and Feeding the Lady Gouldian Finch

Feeding the Lady Gouldian Finch

There are many brands of healthy foods on the market, and many ways of feeding birds. I recently met a woman whose family had bred birds for years before she took over. I feel strongly that in cases like these, doing it “like it’s always been done” is not the best way.

Gouldian Finches Enjoying Chop
Gouldian Finches Enjoying Chop

Yes, our birds lived in the 1980s and 90s. They survived. But did they thrive? What I mean is, were they beautiful and covered in shiny, strong feathers? Were they healthy? How long did they live?

The majority of pet birds in the pre-Internet days were fed seed. Not just any seed, but boxed bird seed from Kmart or someplace – barely better than wild bird seed. And that’s all.

So if that is what you are feeding your birds today, you’re about 40 years behind. Would you like your doctors to treat you medically from protocols of 40 years past?

I didn’t think so.

They survived. But did they thrive?

My own bird keeping has evolved considerably, and continues to change. From seed (yep, I was one of those! I got my first cockatiel from a pet store in the 80s and kept him in one of those small inappropriate cages and feed him seed-only) to seed and pellets to fresh foods and then more fresh foods.

The Suggested Diet for Lady Gouldian Finches

  • Seed
  • Pellets
  • Egg or Egg food
  • Vegetables
  • Fruit
  • Supplements

Pellet food

Seeds are packaged by many different companies today, and they can be purchased at big box stores, small “mom and pop” stores, and online. I’m using a combination of seeds. I’ll put some links at the bottom of this post.

Gouldians, and most finches today, eat much more than seed. Lots of people have gone the pellet route. Pellet food is an extruded form of corn, wheat, and so forth that’s a lot like dog food in that it’s a convenient, easy way to feed birds. But, like dog food, it can be high quality or not. Check your labels.

 

Canaries enjoying Chop
Canaries enjoying Chop

Most vets are suggesting the use of pellets in the diet, but their recommendations are all over the board. I see 20% up to 80% from various vets. We feed less seed than pellets, but pellets are still commercially processed foods and since we humans shouldn’t base our diet on 100% proce4ssed foods I figure our birds shouldn’t either. So I provide a high quality pellet but I don’t serve even 50% pellets. Maybe 50% is comprised of pellets and seeds, so about 30% of their diet is pellet based.

Protein

Finches need extra protein, especially during breeding or molting, so one way to provide that is via eggs or commercial “egg food.” We do both. For eggs, I just hard boil a bunch at once, maybe 6 or 8 (because that’s what my pot holds) brought to a boil on the stove then lowered to simmer for 12 minutes. You can even leave the shells on, throw them all into the food processor, and grind. Don’t mash them too much or they’ll turn to glue.

If you don’t want to serve the shells, or you want to grind the shells finer, peel the eggs before chopping. Egg shells can be ground in a nutri bullet or coffee grinder—here’s one that you can control the coarseness on. Serve them sprinkled on food or in a separate dish; birds go crazy over them.

If you prefer it, use dry egg food. Here is a popular brand

I like to use Higgins, linked below. Dry commercial egg food is good for people who work because it can be left out in a dish like pellets and seeds.

Vegetables

The longer I have birds, the more I’m feeding fresh foods. I have seen proof from others that fresh foods are working for them. Birdie cholesterol levels drop when switched to a plant-based diet. Other numbers fall into line as well. So I chop lots of salad-type foods for my birds: spinach, kale, broccoli, squash, corn, peas, green beans. Basically every time you fix fresh food for yourself, you can cut up a little and set it aside for the birds.

Fruit

Fruit tends to lead to yeast infection, especially in the smaller birds, so I do not give much to my Lady Gouldians. They do get some because I have bigger birds that love fruit – so once in awhile the little guys get some blueberries, strawberries, or similar. Mostly I try to avoid fruit with them.

Supplements

Calcium, iodine, probiotics, and multivitamins are my go-to supplements. Veterinarians suggest that because pellet food is “complete” and has all the nutrients your bird needs, it isn’t necessary to supplement. That is true if you’re feeding `100% pellets. Since I am not, I give 50% or less of the recommended vitamins. I put calcium in the water once a week. I do use probiotics, which I sprinkle on their food, every day; these do not harm them. Kelp provides iodine, and I’ve switched from Avivita Gold  to Nekton-S for no particular reason.

 

That’s the run-down! Hope it helps. Let me know how you feed and supplement your finches.

Products may contain affiliate links; by purchasing them, I can receive compensation which goes to a non-profit parrot rescue organization. Thanks for your help.

                                              
                                              

                     

Best Food for Gouldian Finches – the Gouldian Diet

Our Gouldian Finch Diet

I’m just going to share how we feed our birds. This is not intended to be the be-all, end-all ‘law’ of how to feed Gouldians. There is a lot of discussion about the “best” way to feed. There might even be the occasional heated disagreement. But we consistently raise good size, healthy finches that parent their own babies, and this is how we do it.

Note that this is what we do now. We have evolved over the years, and probably will continue to do so in the future. We like to learn, and as manufacturers improve on what they’re doing we will embrace it. If you read a post last year, it might have a slightly different list.

Basic Diet in Order

Fresh Veggies

Pellet Food

Egg Food

Birdie Bread

Seed Mix

Tiny bit of Fruit

Supplements

The Why and How of the Diet

So. The main food for our finches is fresh food. Vegetables mostly with a small bit of fruit. Mine don’t really like fruit that much, and I don’t like to waste food. So after teaching them how to eat fresh foods, they were still rejecting most fruit and I cut it out instead of continuing to waste it.

Here are just a few of the veggies we serve. The first 5 are their favorites.

Kale

Spinach

Collard greens

Broccoli

Corn (cut off the cob, although they ‘re happy to eat it on the cob)

Carrots, steamed

Peas

Sugar Snap peas

Cooked Sweet potato

Frozen veggies from Walmart: carrots, green beans, corn, peas mix, thawed/warmed –> this is the I’m-too-tired backup plan. I keep these on hand.

The Parrot University aims their diet plan, the Circus Diet, toward bigger birds but it could totally be for finches. Just chop it smaller.

The second food we serve is pellets. We have had a little bit of trouble recently with the pellet food because Roudybush changed their formula and the birds decided to reject it. I then switched to Harrison’s which they ate for a couple weeks (long enough for me to order a bunch) then they turned their beakies up at that.

Darn it.

So now I bought another bag of Roudybush and about half of them are eating it. I’m not really sure what to do. I did find they’ll eat the Harrison’s and the old bag of Roudybush if I wet and warm it. Little prince and princesses!

You’ll have to try to find the best pellets for yours, and it can be really frustrating if they have not eaten pellets in the past. More on that in a future post!

Please don’t go crazy on the pellets. They are an extruded processed food

After the pellet food, the next thing we probably serve the most of is egg food or birdie bread, which I consider interchangeable. I do make my own and avoid sugar at all costs. I see no reason whatsoever to give finches sugary food that could lead to a yeast overgrowth. Just my 2 cents.

Seed mix should come after all those foods. Seeds are not a complete diet. If you feed your birds only seeds, they’re going to have some deficits, like “holes” in their nutritional makeup. They will lack calcium, or Vitamin A, or D3. You might feel they’re healthy “except for…”

That’s what I hear. Except for egg binding.Or, Except for unexplained deaths. One lady wants to buy from me (I have finally quit selling to her) but she wants exceptionally young birds because “they don’t live more than 3 years.” Well, mine do. I bet if we examined her Gouldian diet, we’d find the problem.

Anyway, don’t believe the pet store employee who’s never owned a bird if they tell you to buy the seed and nothing else. Please. And don’t feed it because your grandmother gave seed-only to her canaries and it was good enough for her. Our understanding of birds has evolved since then. More scientists have studied their diets since then. We’ve all fed our birds and, via the Internet, we’ve pooled our information. We are better now!

So seed should fall near the bottom of  the list. It is easy, but it’s like you and me eating potato chips every meal. Do we want to? Of course! But is it good for us? No way.

Now, I’ve listed fruit way down near the bottom, although I serve the fresh fruit with the veggies or in the bread, and I’m not sure it’s really that small. Honestly mine don’t care for fruit. They absolutely won’t touch anything with orange or tangelo (darn it — I have a tangelo tree) or lime. I read that you could let a canary teach them to eat oranges; mine said no go. So I give a little apple now and then, or some applesauce in the bread, or maybe a slice of pear. That’s all.

Supplements

At the   very bottom we have supplements. Calcium, D3, or just a good overall vitamin will do well. Remember to account for what’s in the pellets — you don’t want to overdose them. I figure my birds get about 1/3 what the manufacturer recommends, so I give them 1/3 the recommended vitamins. I like to use the kind that you mix in water.

That’s about it! Please let me know if you have any diet questions. I’ll try to answer them the best I can.

 

 

 

 

 

Is Bird Bread Useful for Finches?

 

Bird Bread for Great Gouldian Health

You may have heard of birdie bread but never served it to your finches. If you have a small number, you may even wonder if it’s worth it. Because it is another way to offer healthy food, I believe birdie bread is an important part of the weekly diet. If you make large batches and freeze them, y ou’ll have plenty for weeks to come.

What is It?

Birdie bread is a healthy, sugar free bread made from flour or cornmeal, vegetables, fruit or fruit juice, and additives like seeds or nuts. Some people sprinkle vitamin powder, probiotics, or other supplements on the bread to ensure the birds ingest it. Bread is especially good for those rushed mornings when you simply can’t make chop. If created with pellets and vegetables, it is just as good for them as anything else you serve.

Here are a couple of ways to make birdie bread that works for finches.

Gouldian Gardens Super Awesome Birdie Bread

5-6 eggs
1 cup pellets (I use roudybush) soaked in water or apple juice to cover
1 cup flour: Soy, wheat, oat, whatever type you are comfortable with
3-4 jars toddler vegetables (baby food)
Any fresh vegetables you have on hand
Water if you didn’t use baby food
Cinnamon, about 1 T

Because my fids are small, I whirl the veggies in the food processor. Then I add baby food, eggs, pellets, and last put in the flour a little at a time. You may need to add water. It should be thicker than human bread mix would be.

You can add bird seed if you have new birds that aren’t use to breads. Also add nuts, flax seed, chia seed, etc. Spread into 9X13 pan and bake at 350 for about 30 minutes. I cut into small squares and freeze most. It always smells so good hubby begs to eat it. (Actually I think maybe he’s tried it)

Easiest Bird Bread

8 eggs, reserve shells
1-2 cups flour
1 cup of pellets (I use Roudybush) soaked in apple juice or water
2-4 cups broccoli, carrots, and squash OR a large bag of frozen corn/peas/carrots.
2 T coconut oil, divided.

Put eggs in large bowl and whisk. Add flour a little at a time. If using pellets, only put in 1 cup flour – if no pellets, use 2 cups. Let the pellets absorb water before stirring them in. Chop the vegetables finely in food processor (thaw first if frozen). Grind the egg shells very fine (I use a nutribullet) and stir in. Add 1 T coconut oil.

Spread the other Tablespoon of coconut oil in the bottom of a 13X9” baking pan. Spread bread mix on top, it will be thick.

Bake in oven 30 minutes at 350 or until slightly brown on top. Cut into tiny squares and serve. Freeze unused portions up to a month or more.

Optional additives to bird bread: dry egg food, up to 1 cup – add ¾ cup water with it. Bird seed, as much as you like. Ground flax seed or chia seeds are appreciated too. Baby food, toddler veggies, work in place of fresh veggies.

Note: many people recommend using cornbread mix in place of flour. I do not use it because of the sugar content, which can easily lead to yeast infections.

 

For our entire bird diet, go here.